Recommended Article: Fathers & Services

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The article provided below discusses the importance of a father’s involvement during pregnancy and the lack of early education parent programs specifically for fathers in the United States. The article raises awareness on this important issue, provides supporting data, and presents various programs addressing this need.

Article:

Lee, J. Y., & Lee, S. J. (2018, June 14). Fathers forgotten when it comes to services to help them be good parents, new study finds. The Conversation, Retrieved from https://theconversation.com/fathers-forgotten-when-it-comes-to-services-to-help-them-be-good-parents-new-study-finds-98222

Photo Credit: melindarmacaronikidcom, Pixabay, License: CC Public Domain

Aneeta Pearson, MSW, MS

(c) 2017-2020 ANEETA PEARSON ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 

Recommended Article: Mom & Baby Bond

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The following thought-provoking article discusses the issue of inmates raising their babies behind bars while completing their sentences. The growing debate about “The Moms and Babies” program revolves around its suitability. While the program provides a mom and baby bond, the issue of raising a baby in a prison environment may seem unhealthy.

Article:

Jouvenal, J. (2018, May 11). Raising babies behind bars. A bold experiment in parenting and punishment is allowing children in prison. But is that a good thing? Washington Post, Retrieved from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/local/wp/2018/05/11/feature/prisons-are-allowing-mothers-to-raise-their-babies-behind-bars-but-is-the-radical-experiment-in-parenting-and-punishment-a-good-idea/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.d6db2df62ac9

Photo Credit: ElasticComputeFarm, Pixabay, License: CC Public Domain

Aneeta Pearson, MSW, MS

(c) 2017-2020 ANEETA PEARSON ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Recommended Literature: STOP FGM!

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Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), according to the World Health Organization (WHO), is defined as “the partial or total removal of the female genitalia or injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons.” In many countries around the world, FGM remains a persistent practice. The “benefits” of this practice include, but not limited to: virginity (remaining “pure” before marriage) and reduce the urge to commit “illicit” sexual acts. Studies upon studies prove that FGM can cause Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), death, infertility, and other long-term health complications. Despite research and programs aimed to end FGM; the practice of FGM continues. Do They Hear You When You Cry by Fauziya Kassindja is a must read. A true-life story of FGM and survival… a story I will never forget.

*Please get involved and support a program to end FGM.

 Do They Hear You When You Cry available on Amazon or your local library.

Photo Credit: Clker-Free-Vector-Images, Pixabay, License: CC Public Domain

Aneeta Pearson, MSW, MS

(c) 2017-2020 ANEETA PEARSON ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Recommended Literature: Family Violence & Parental Alienation

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Parental alienation, considered a form of emotional abuse, is the psychological manipulation of a child turning against the unwanted parent. Parental alienation usually occurs in cases of divorce or separation. Family violence, on the other hand, is often overlooked by professionals when a child is unwilling to live with or visit a parent in cases of separation or divorce. The literature below provides research on the importance of screening for family violence and finding the root cause of a child’s behavior rather than labeling a parent as ‘alienated.’

A link and citation to the literature are  below:

Saunders, D. G., & Faller, K. C. (2016). The need to carefully screen for family violence when parental alienation is claimed. Michigan Family Law Journal, 46, 7-11.

Photo Credit: Tumisu, Pixabay, License: CC Public Domain

Aneeta Pearson, MSW, MS

(c) 2017-2020 ANEETA PEARSON ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Recommended Articles: Protected by the Law

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December 2017

The act of disciplining children as a form of punishment is slowly but surely becoming an act of the past. Physical punishment, also known as spanking or corporal punishment, is banned in many countries around the world. For instance, passed in Peru, a Law “prohibits physical and humiliating punishment against children and adolescents in all the environments.” Hopefully, this movement will encourage leaders to enact laws that protect children worldwide.

Articles:

The 51 countries that have banned corporal punishment (2016, November 21). UN Tribune, Retrieved from  http://untribune.com/the-51-countries-that-have-banned-corporal-punishment/

United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund: UNICEF congratulates Peru for approval of law that prohibits physical and humiliating punishment, UNICEF, Peru, December 2015. Retrieved from https://www.unicef.org/peru/spanish/media_31907.htm

Photo Credit: CQF-avocat, Pixabay, License: CC Public Domain

Aneeta Pearson, MSW, MS

(c) 2017-2018 ANEETA PEARSON ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Recommended Article: “The Talk”

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As a parent, when is it appropriate to have the “The Talk” with your child? “The Talk” in this sense referring to international and national news reported almost daily about racism, discrimination, gender inequality, xenophobia, LGBTQ rights, etc. It can be a daunting task but doable. The following article provides tips and offers support on how to approach these sensitive issues with children.

Article:

Ravitz, J. (2017, August 14). Talking to children when hate makes headlines. CNN, Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/14/health/talking-to-kids-about-hate/index.html

Photo Credit: Free-Photos/9124 images, Pixabay, License: CC Public Domain

Aneeta Pearson, MSW, MS

(c) 2017-2020 ANEETA PEARSON ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 

Recommended Articles: Co-housing and Child Rearing

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July 2017

Co-housing is an intentional community of private homes clustered around shared space such as a large common, kitchen, laundry, recreational, and dining area. Co-housing began in Denmark and expanded into the United States and Northern Europe. However, there are co-housing advantages and disadvantages in regard to child rearing. The articles below provide insight on this slow but steady growing trend of co-housing and if co-housing is a thing of the past or future.

Articles:

DePaulo, B. (2016, November 17). Even in Tough Times, You Can Find New Ways to Be Better Off. Psychology Today, Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/living-single/201611/even-in-tough-times-you-can-find-new-ways-be-better

Lozanova, S. (2012, December 26). Raising Kids in Cohousing Communities. Mother Earth Living, Retrieved from http://www.motherearthliving.com/smart-parenting/raising-kids-in-cohousing-communities

Markle, E. A. (2014). Social support, social capital, and social sustainability in cohousing communities: A mixed-method analysis (Doctoral dissertation, Northeastern University).

Photo Credit: werner22brigitte, Pixabay, License: CC Public Domain

Aneeta Pearson, MSW, MS

(c) 2017 ANEETA PEARSON ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 


 

Recommended Articles: Raised Back Home

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June 2017

Whether it is the stress of seeking and securing employment, a demanding work schedule, financial difficulty, or lack of childcare; for many immigrant parents, the decision to send their child back home (the country of parent’s birth) to grandparents or relatives to care for him or her, can be a difficult one. It is undeniable that making this life changing decision can emotionally, mentally, and physically affect the parents and child. The following articles provide insight on the growing trend of “satellite babies” and how this trend often leaves children traumatized.

Articles:

Muller, R. T. (2013, August 30). Satellite Babies: Immigration and Disrupted Attachment. Psychology Today, Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/talking-about-trauma/201308/satellite-babies-immigration-and-disrupted-attachment

Wang, H. L., Fertig, B. (2016, October 13). Born In The U.S., Raised In China: ‘Satellite Babies’ Have A Hard Time Coming Home. NPR, Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/10/13/492860463/born-in-the-u-s-raised-in-china-satellite-babies-have-a-hard-time-coming-home

Xiao, H. (2017, May 26). Unique book reveals life of satellite babies. China Daily USA, Retrieved from http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/epaper/2017-05/26/content_29510613.htm

Photo Credit: Gellinger, Pixabay, License: CC Public Domain

Aneeta Pearson, MSW, MS

(c) 2017 ANEETA PEARSON ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Recommended Article: Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

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June 2017

In the United States, according to the Child Welfare Information Gateway, Federal Guidelines of Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect, mandated reporters typically include social workers, law enforcement, child care providers, teachers, principals, and other school personnel, medical examiners or coroners, physicians, nurses, and other health-care workers, counselors, therapists, and other mental health professionals. Therefore, it is imperative that professionals receive ongoing education and training to identify and assess child abuse and neglect. It is equally vital that the reporting and investigation process encourage, not deter, professionals to report suspected cases of child abuse or neglect. In the article, “Improvements needed for child abuse reporting,” medical professionals in Korea urge the Korean government to improve the reporting process and not punish physicians who fail to report.

A link and citation to the article is below:

Chu, M. (2017, May 17). Improvements needed for child abuse reporting. Korea Biomedical Review, Retrieved from http://www.koreabiomed.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=572

Additional Reading:

Child Welfare Information Gateway. (2016). Mandatory reporters of child abuse and neglect. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children’s Bureau. Retrieved from https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/systemwide/laws-policies/statutes/manda/ 

Photo Credit: DarkoStojanovic, Pixabay, License: CC Public Domain

Aneeta Pearson, MSW, MS

(c) 2017 ANEETA PEARSON ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 

 

 

Recommended Article: “It takes a village”

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Let’s face it, child abuse is a topic that many people would rather not talk about. Hearing the stories of children abused by those meant to protect them is not only horrible but will make a person lose faith in humanity, if not already. Child abuse is a silent growing epidemic in the United States. “It takes a village to raise a child” and it should take that same “village” to report suspected child abuse. Child protection is everyone’s business. Dr. John DeGarmo, an international expert on foster care, boldly writes about his personal experience as a foster care parent and how it is critically important that as a nation, we must not turn away from stories of child abuse, but help end it.

A link and citation to the article are below:

DeGarmo, J. (2017, April 11). You Want To Save The Trees, Animals, The World. What About Saving The Children? The Ugly Truth About Child Abuse. Huffington Post, Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/you-want-to-save-the-trees-animals-the-world-what_us_58e54631e4b00ea3841db550

Photo Credit: Coyot, Pixabay, License: CC Public Domain

Aneeta Pearson, MSW, MS

(c) 2017-2020 ANEETA PEARSON ALL RIGHTS RESERVED